Authors

Document Type

Presentation

Publication Date

1952

Abstract

At the time of the first lecture, April 11, 1949, there was considerable interest at the University in different methods of organizing materials for use. Accordingly, Dr. Maurice F. Tauber, Professor, School of Library Service, Columbia University, was asked to speak on some phase of classification in university libraries today. Dr. Tauber is well known as a specialist in this field, having done research in it at the University of Chicago, where he received the Ph.D. degree. He has held the following library positions: Head, Catalog Department, Temple University; Chief, Preparations Division, University of Chicago; and Assistant Director in charge of Technical Processes, Columbia University. The second lecture, that by Dr. Louis Round Wilson on April 21, 1950, was planned to provide information for university administrators, professors, and librarians on the relationship of the library to the university program with particular reference to the graduate school. Since the graduate program at Tennessee has grown rapidly during recent years, this, too, was a timely topic. Dr. Wilson, as Librarian of the University of North Carolina durmg a period of tremendous growth in its graduate school, and as former Dean, Graduate Library School, University of Chicago, had the experience and enthusiasm to make his lecture one of special interest and value. The final lecture in this volume was presented on June 3, 1950, when the main library building was named for President Emeritus James D. Hoskins. The choice of Mr. John E. Burchard, Dean of Humanities, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, to speak on the library's function in higher education was a particularly happy one. As former Director of Libraries at that institution and as an eminent architect and scholar, Mr. Burchard made a significant addition to the occasion as well as to the lecture series.

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