Date of Award

6-1975

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Major

Educational Administration

Major Professor

Charles E. Trotter

Committee Members

Harry M. Lindquist, C. Kenneth Tanner, Woodrow W. Wyatt

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to identify basic concepts related to the instruction and preparation of specialists in school facility planning. The procedures followed in the treatment of the problem were: (1) to trace the emerging role of specialists in school facility planning; (2) to review existing instruction in school facility planning at the major universities and colleges in the United States; and (3) to develop a model for the instruction and preparation of specialists in that field.

Correspondence was undertaken with all the instructors of courses in school facility planning that were offered at the major universities and colleges in the United States relative to course titles and descriptions, course outlines and activities, and textbooks utilized. These instructors and a selected number of architects were requested to submit suggestions as to what ought to be included in the instruction and preparation of specialists. Concurrently, an extensive review of literature was undertaken to trace the emerging role of specialists in school facility planning, and programs of instruction involved in their preparation.

A descriptive analysis was made of the introductory course offered by 139 universities and colleges, and of the advanced courses taught in thirty-two of these institutions: The analysis was presented under seven major divisions: (1) introductory overview; (2) role of personnel and agencies involved in school facility planning; (3) determining facility needs; (4) planning facility needs; (5) implementing the building program; (6) managing the school plant; and (7) planning for the future.

A model for the instruction and preparation of specialists in school facility planning was developed from an examination of topics and activities utilized by instructors of courses in school facility planning, from a review of literature, and from suggestions presented of what ought to be included in such a program. This model was submitted to a panel of experts made up of those instructors who were directing doctoral programs for specialists in school facility planning and the selected architects. The panel of experts was requested to comment on the proposed model.

The reaction of the panel of experts to the proposed model constituted the final source of information utilized in the recommended model. The model was developed upon ten preliminary conclusions that served as the rationale from which the instructional program, the service activities, and the research projects were developed. Five major divisions were presented and their relationship. These were: (1) foundations of education and educational administration; (2) structure of a core block of content and experiences related to educational administration, to related areas in the social context, and to collateral areas in the field of curriculum development; (3) specialization in the area of school facility planning involving the determining, planning, and implementing of school facility needs; (4) service activities in school facility planning; and (5) research in school facility planning.

The findings of the study revealed that the instruction and preparation of specialists in school facility planning was not widespread, and the main purpose of most courses in school facility planning was for the benefit of superintendents and principals of schools. There was interest in the development of programs to instruct and prepare specialists. There were certain on-the-job learning experiences necessary to complement classroom instruction. An active internship appeared basic to the preparation of specialists in school facility planning.

A recommendation generated by the findings of this study was that a basic introductory course should be required for all school administrators. An advanced course should be planned to meet the needs of certification for school superintendents. In addition to the above two courses, specialists in school facility planning should have a minimum of six months of internship involved with ongoing school facility planning activities, either in private or public school systems. The development of school planning laboratories as resource centers was critical to the adequate instruction and preparation of specialists. There should be more interdisciplinary coordination and exchange of personnel in the instruction and preparation program. More institutions of higher learning should offer graduate students an opportunity to specialize in school facility planning.

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