Date of Award

3-1976

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Major Professor

Michael E. Gordon

Committee Members

J.M. Larsen, R.D. Arvey, S.K. Reed, & G.K. LaBorde

Abstract

One hundred sixty-seven trainees at a vocational training school were provided with job descriptions in which the levels of intrinsic and extrinsic outcomes along with whether or not the jobs were unionized were varied. Ss then completed questionnaires to assess anticipated reactions to the jobs.

It was predicted that both intrinsic and extrinsic outcomes would be related to anticipated job satisfaction, that whether or not a job was unionized would moderate the relationship between extrinsic outcomes and anticipated attitudes towards management, that only extrinsic outcomes would be related to anticipated attitudes toward a union, and that only extrinsic outcomes would be related to anticipated desire for union representation.

The results of a series of 2x2x2 and 2x2 ANOVA's supported all but the prediction that whether or not the job was unionized would moderate the relationship between extrinsic outcomes and anticipated attitudes towards management. The relationship between extrinsic outcomes and desire for union representation was somewhat complex, in that when the job was already unionized, it was positive in direction, but when the job was not unionized, it was negative.

Results were interpreted to provide evidence that both intrinsic and extrinsic outcomes are important determinants of satisfaction with the job and positive attitudes toward management, but only extrinsic outcomes are important in determining positive attitudes toward a union and desire for union representation. Relationships between the dependent variables provided evidence for the concept of dual allegiance to management and union.

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