Date of Award

5-2010

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

Psychology

Major Professor

Gregory L. Stuart

Committee Members

Todd M. Moore, Kristina C. Gordon

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that victims of dating violence consume alcohol at greater rates than their non-victimized peers, placing them at risk for the negative consequences produced by alcohol use. Thus, research is needed that examines factors that protect victims from consuming alcohol. Toward this end, the present study sought to examine if perceived and enacted support served as stress-buffering variables of the relationship between dating violence victimization and alcohol problems among a sample of currently dating college students. Partial support was found for the stress-buffering effect of perceived support, but findings did not support enacted support as a traditional stress-buffering variable. Implications of these findings for dating violence prevention programming are discussed.

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