Date of Award

12-2018

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Education

Major Professor

David Cihak

Committee Members

Marion Coleman-Lopatic, Tara Moore, Christopher H. Skinner

Abstract

Technology is increasingly present in our classrooms, with expectations that students will each have their own device in a 1:1 classroom in every school. With classroom management as the most important factor affecting student learning and achievement (Emmer & Stough, 2001; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993), the purpose of this two-companion studies dissertation is to research the use of technology and self-management system components to determine its effects on on-task engagement and disruptive classroom behavior of adolescents with disabilities.The first chapter is a literature review providing an overview of self-management, focusing on self-monitoring and self-graphing. The literature review synthesizes the research regarding specific components related to student task engagement and behavior within the classroom and describes how technology has been utilized in current literature.In Study I, four adolescent students were successfully taught to use Google Forms© to self-record their behavior. Data were collected to compare a paper-based self-recording procedure or a technology-based procedure using a single-case alternating treatments design. Results indicated that students using technology was more efficient and increased on-task performance and/or decreased disruptive behavior better or equal to paper-based self-monitoring procedures. Additionally, both students and teachers preferred technology to paper-based self-monitoring.During Study II, the same four students participated in a second alternating treatments design study to compare paper-based self-graphing procedures or automatic graphing procedures on Google Forms©. Results indicated that students using technology-based automatic graphing increased on-task performance and/or decreased disruptive behavior better or equal to paper-based self-graphing. Moreover, technology-based automatic graphing was more efficient. Also, both students and teachers preferred technology to paper-based self-monitoring.Chapter 4 discusses these findings, conclusions, implications, and how utilizing technology has impacted self-monitoring in the context of using a more efficient intervention given similar efficacious results. Limitations and recommendations for future research in self-monitoring with technology for students with disabilities are provided.

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