Date of Award

6-1950

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology

Major Professor

Herman C. Lichstein

Committee Members

Lowell F. Bailey, William B. Cherry, J. O. Mundt, T. P. Salo, George P. Mueller

Abstract

Introduction: In any study of enzymatic action in the living cell there can be no limited definition of the influences measured, since there are numerous interrelated chemical reactions, both assimilative and dissimilative, which are in a constant state of equilibrium. This circumstance has been adequately described by Dixon (1949) who states that the living cell exists as a system of unstable catalyst which in turn exist because of the occurrence of the reactions which they catalyze. Each enzyme does not maintain itself; it is rather a collective effort by a certain minimum number of enzymes which brings about the necessary series of reactions for a resynthesis. Thus it becomes necessary to study enzymatic reactions as a means of viewing life processes, but at the same time, it remains essential to study these reactions, not only as isolated crystalline moieties, but also as a particular link in a large chain of reactions.

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