Source Publication (e.g., journal title)

Journal of Small Animal Practice

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-2018

DOI

10.1111/jsap.12792

Abstract

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine if a urine sodium concentration could be used to rule out hypoadrenocorticism in hyponatraemic dogs.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Medical records were reviewed for hyponatraemic dogs (serum sodium/L) that had recorded urine sodium concentrations. Twenty hyponatraemic dogs were included: 11 diagnosed with classical hypoadrenocorticism and nine with non-adrenal causes of hyponatraemia. A Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare results between groups.

RESULTS:

No dog with hypoadrenocorticism had a urine sodium concentration less than 30 mmol/L. Urine sodium concentration in dogs with hypoadrenocorticism was significantly higher (median 103 mmol/L, range: 41 to 225) than in dogs with non-adrenal illness (median 10 mmol/L, range: 2 to 86) (P

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE:

These results suggest that urine sodium concentrations can be used to prioritise a differential diagnosis of hypoadrenocorticism in hyponatraemic dogs. A urine sodium concentration less than 30 mmol/L in a hyponatraemic dog makes classical hypoadrenocorticism an unlikely cause of the hyponatraemia. Nevertheless, because of the small sample size our results should be interpreted with caution and a larger follow-up study would be valuable.

Submission Type

Post-print

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