Department (e.g. History, Chemistry, Finance, etc.)

Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication

College (e.g. College of Engineering, College of Arts & Sciences, Haslam College of Business, etc.)

Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Abstract

Women are the minority in production agriculture and their leadership roles in agricultural industries are rarely explored. Therefore, the leadership development of five prominent agriculture leaders in Australia was chosen to be explored for this study. Connections were drawn between each case study, emphasizing the central research question of “How have women in agriculture sustained their leadership role in a male-dominated field?” Impacting their styles of leadership within farming and other agribusiness trades were the shared themes of their childhood dynamics, their individual support systems, and their current home life. This study used a constructivist paradigm, as reflecting upon the subjects’ past cultural experiences were crucial in understanding their current positions in life and leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted with each participant and their objective experiences were evaluated. Further research of associated interpretations contributed to the conceptualization of the individual data. Their personal journeys were then examined, cross-referenced and compiled into an analytical study that aims to recognize successful women in agricultural leadership roles traditionally held by men.

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Women in Agriculture: A Qualitative Study Examining How Women Have Sustained Their Leadership Roles in Agriculture in Australia

Women are the minority in production agriculture and their leadership roles in agricultural industries are rarely explored. Therefore, the leadership development of five prominent agriculture leaders in Australia was chosen to be explored for this study. Connections were drawn between each case study, emphasizing the central research question of “How have women in agriculture sustained their leadership role in a male-dominated field?” Impacting their styles of leadership within farming and other agribusiness trades were the shared themes of their childhood dynamics, their individual support systems, and their current home life. This study used a constructivist paradigm, as reflecting upon the subjects’ past cultural experiences were crucial in understanding their current positions in life and leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted with each participant and their objective experiences were evaluated. Further research of associated interpretations contributed to the conceptualization of the individual data. Their personal journeys were then examined, cross-referenced and compiled into an analytical study that aims to recognize successful women in agricultural leadership roles traditionally held by men.