Program Title

Leading, Branding and Mentoring of Minority Students: Alone on the PWI Island!!

Location

Carolyn P. Brown Memorial University Center

Program Abstract/Summary

Leading, Branding and Mentoring of Minority Students: Alone on the PWI Island!!

The purpose of this session is to illuminate mentoring relationship efforts and programs, which aid in the development of Black student-(athletes) in the 21st century. More specifically, this session will demonstrate the significance of race, ethnicity, and culture in facilitating the formal and informal mentoring efforts in the context of the predominantly white institution of higher education (PWIHE). While mentoring has numerous definitions, the practice itself has several benefits to include career support, emotional and psychosocial support, and role modeling. In an effort to achieve its benefits, the mentor-mentee relationship should entail a level of trust, a mutual vision or goal, professional skill development, and networking opportunities. That said, mentoring Black students in the PWIHE also aid in retention, academic achievement, identity development, and strategies to cope with institutional racism. However, what about mentoring today’s Black student-(athlete)? This session will provide a forum for the emergence of mentoring relationships and discussions around the Black student (-athletes) and provide insight into the various program a) philosophies, b) models, c) challenges, and d) solutions.

Comments

This will be a workshop/panel discussion

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Leading, Branding and Mentoring of Minority Students: Alone on the PWI Island!!

Carolyn P. Brown Memorial University Center

Leading, Branding and Mentoring of Minority Students: Alone on the PWI Island!!

The purpose of this session is to illuminate mentoring relationship efforts and programs, which aid in the development of Black student-(athletes) in the 21st century. More specifically, this session will demonstrate the significance of race, ethnicity, and culture in facilitating the formal and informal mentoring efforts in the context of the predominantly white institution of higher education (PWIHE). While mentoring has numerous definitions, the practice itself has several benefits to include career support, emotional and psychosocial support, and role modeling. In an effort to achieve its benefits, the mentor-mentee relationship should entail a level of trust, a mutual vision or goal, professional skill development, and networking opportunities. That said, mentoring Black students in the PWIHE also aid in retention, academic achievement, identity development, and strategies to cope with institutional racism. However, what about mentoring today’s Black student-(athlete)? This session will provide a forum for the emergence of mentoring relationships and discussions around the Black student (-athletes) and provide insight into the various program a) philosophies, b) models, c) challenges, and d) solutions.